Dirt Weed Killer

I use the dirt itself to kill weeds. Look at the first picture on the left and you will see a row of sweet corn with small grass growing in among the corn plants. I have run the tiller between the rows and loosened the soil and chopped up the weeds and grass growing there. So I go down the rows with a hoe and pull the dirt in around the corn plants to cover the small weeds growing there. It works pretty well. The broadleaf weeds and grass have to be fairly small and the corn has to be a few inches high. But you can hill the soil up around the corn. it likes the whole process.

I started doing this a long time ago after driving a cultivating field corn with a tractor. At the time I think I did 6 rows at a time. You go rather slowly with a cultivator behind the tractor that is a series of small shovels. They are spaced on a bar to work the soil between the rows right up to the plants. They also move the soil into and around the corn plants as you go along on the tractor. You adjust your speed and depth of the cultivator to make sure you do not bury the corn. Also you have to pay close attention to make sure the cultivator does not just dig out the corn as you go along so it is an arduous job to do all day long. Farmers don’t do any cultivating now. At least the ones around here don’t. They rely entirely on chemicals to kill weeds. But, that is a whole other story and I do not want to get started on that.

This method of cultivation will work with green beans, okra, onions, or anything big enough to have some dirt piled up around it. It does not work well for young carrots because they are too small. I usually crawl along on the ground and pick the weeds out of those.

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Wildlife

I discovered some deer visited the garden sometime in the last couple of days. In fact, it may have been last night. They nibbled off some of the green beans. Then, strolled around a bit and left. I was lucky they did not eat the whole row of beans, or my cabbage plants. They walked right down the cabbage row for a ways. Rabbits probably would have eaten the whole mess. They probably were not that hungry because everything is lush right now from all the rain. But, they may become a problem. they nibble the leaves off the top and move on to the next. You can see in the pic below the next leaves growing out and the plant will survive and continue to grow but it will be stunted. 

The telltale track of deer. The two lobed elliptical shaped indentations. If you are missing some plants and you have these tracks in the dirt you know what it is. 

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Rain in the Garden

I went out to look around after last nights big rain.

I mentioned it yesterday in a post that it was supposed to rain some more and it did. I have heard as much as 5 inches fell in this county last night. It was just a steady rain for hours. There are small lakes in a lot of fields in the area and the creeks are busting out. We noticed our young plum tree in the front yard. In the pic below you can see how the top branches are just drooped over. I don’t know why exactly. Maybe it is because there is so much water in the branches and leaves that they just could not support the weight. This tree should have been pruned this past late winter but I did not get it done because I have been so involved in work on the house. 

I also mentioned earlier about my tomatoes looking sick. I have about 9 various tomato plants of the common variety you can buy anywhere and they look sick. I have three heirloom tomatoes, Cherokee Red, that look much better. Check out the pic below of my sorry looking tomato. It must be the cool wet weather. But I have never had them just turn yellow and die back like this. 

It is a sad thing to see. Along with the big rains comes tremendous field erosion. Below is a pic of the corner of the field right where we turn into our yard. This corner washes out like this and the farmer goes over it with and implement and levels it up and another rain does this again to it. There are numerous places like this on this farm and lots of other farms as well. There is only one solution to the problem and that is to stop farming it. Nothing else will correct the problem. Agriculture in inherently destructive. Little work has been done to alleviate that destruction. When I first moved here and worked on this farm most of the fields had grass waterways where the water collected and drained off. It did slow down the erosion. The grass waterways have been removed and replaced with these little dam like dirt structures with a drain pipe and tile line. This allows the ground that had grass to produce a money product instead of protect the field. There are lots of factors and influences involved here that had brought us to the current situation and it is too involved to get into here. Suffice it to say that it is the same situation as so many other industries that are after short term profit with disregard for the consequences. 

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Garage Lumber

My garage is full!

My garage is so full of lumber, windows, trim, clapboard siding, and assorted building materials I cannot hardly even walk into it. I have places to step while crawling over stuff. It is one of my storage places for all the stuff I salvage from other places. I have quite a bit of stuff in a large machine shed over at my mother-in-laws place also. I salvage it all to use it. We have an old house and we have rebuilt parts of it and added on to it and we use as much recycled lumber as possible. I am building a new solar collecting front porch right now. I am building soffits on it to look somewhat like the original soffits on the house. I cannot duplicate what is there because I cannot get the old moldings used back then. The earliest part of the house is about 150 years old. 

I also have a nice pile of bricks which I should have taken a picture of but did not. They do not have to be inside like the lumber. I intend to rebuild the old fireplace in the living room this summer. It will be a big job. I have built one fireplace in the dining room that works great so am looking forward to this job.

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Mulch

It is supposed to rain today but the sun is shining this morning although it is cool and breezy. It was supposed to frost on Saturday evening but I think it only got down to about 37 degrees. I had covered some of my tomatoes and peppers but it turned out it was not necessary. It was real windy Friday evening and into the night. I came out Saturday morning to find most of my paper and straw mulch on my potatoes had blown off. It was a mess so I spent Saturday morning redoing it all. Below is a picture of the finished job. I have used this brown paper before to mulch my potatoes and it works well. I was not going to spend the money on the stuff this year but we had this covering a newly refinished floor at the Old School Museum where I work part time. We removed it all and I brought it home. Problem was I did not have it all weighted down enough. So when I redid it all I shoveled dirt onto a lot of the edges to hole it down. Once it rains on it it will be pretty well stuck down. The problem with putting dirt on it is you invariably are putting some weed seeds on top of the mulch and they will sprout and grow thus making the mulch effort somewhat pointless. But it beats cultivating the entire row and all that space in between the rows. I only had two bales of straw on hand and the farmer I get hay and straw from was most likely working in his fields when I first did this so I wasn’t going to bother him for a couple of more bales of straw. 

I have been very diligent in putting up and keeping up my chicken wire barrier around my spring garden. If I don’t the rabbits will just eat it all off. One evening there were two rabbits just hanging around out there probably wishing they could just get over that fence. They probably could just jump over if they thought of it but they don’t. They will go under it though if there is an opening so one must maintain a vigil to make sure there is no where they can get under it. I use metal fence posts, bricks, and pieces of firewood to make sure it is held down. I bend the fence in a sort of arc with about 3 of 4 inches laying flat on the ground and the rest kind of arched back over and then stake it with various small electric fence posts. I use one inch mesh wire. Anything bigger and the little baby rabbits will go right through it. The wire I use is 2 feet tall so it actually is not that high once it is staked. It does the job though against rabbits. It is worthless against deer or other animals like ground hogs. So far I have not had any trouble with them.

I got my tomatoes and peppers set out. I bought 3 heirloom tomatoes at the Organic food store where I shop. They are Cherokee Red or Purple. I have never raised this variety before but have purchased the tomatoes at the farmers market in Springfield so I am looking forward to having these to eat. Then I planted some of the common varieties so we can can tomatoes this summer. Our canned tomatoes from last summer lasted until about February or so. I also planted some green beans and sweet corn. Neither has come up yet but if it starts raining, and the forecast is for rain for the next 4 or 5 days they should come up just fine. I thought I had some okra seeds on hand but I didn’t so I have not planted any of that yet and I am waiting to plant cucumbers and squash. The later the better for those. If you wait until about June or so to plant those then you do not have the bug problems that ruin those crops every year.

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